Radical Decision (Day 10)

I thought it might be appropriate to write up a short report about my experience. I radically altered my dietary intake beginning on June 24 (mainly fruits & vegetables, drinking water–it almost sounds like Daniel 1:12). On July 1, I began a juice fast, making my own juices from raw produce, both fruit and vegetables, and drinking water somewhat massively (easily over 100 ounces a day), with an occasional herbal tea.

Since June 24, I have lost about 22 pounds, but still have a bunch to go. This is Day 10 of the juice fast, inspired by Joe Cross’s documentary (2011), Fat, Sick, and Nearly Dead. I have not been hungry. I don’t think I have been overly irritable. I came down with one of those evil summer colds after I started, so I have been dealing with that. We spent the first six days of my juice fast in a condo at Table Rock Lake in Branson. Since coming home, rather than preparing juice in the mornings, I have found it more agreeable to prepare juice in the evenings, for consumption the next day. It has not been too bad. Every morning (since we arrived back home), I have been walking on the treadmill. I can see that I am getting stronger.

Here are a few of my juice creations:

FBJ1 FBJ2 FBJ3

 

We got back from Branson on Saturday afternoon. On Sunday, I sold a Chinese motor scooter that I had ridden for seven years. I think I sold it at top dollar. On Monday, I bought a 1981 Honda CM400E (sight unseen) on eBay, located 83 miles away. It only cost my $216 dollars more than I received for the motor scooter, but I am certain that it will last A LOT LONGER! Insurance is just about the same as what I was paying, and it cost me all of $35 to apply for the new title and pay sales tax. I ordered a trunk for it, as that was my modus operandi with the scooter, as far as carrying laptop, books, etc. That should probably arrive next week. Here is a photo of it in my favorite parking spot at work:

Honda3

 

Some of the other bikers who work at OCC tell me that they think I got an excellent purchase. It was titled in the name of a husband and wife. She has taught at a Christian school in Chanute, KS, and both taught and knows very well some of my former students.

There IS concern that I have about the juice fast. On Friday afternoon, I will start what is called Weekend Intervention Program, part of SATOP (Missouri’s education/rehabilitation of people who drive motor vehicles under the influence of alcohol). I will spend 22 face-to-face hours with a Spanish-speaking “client,” functioning as his interpreter. My concern is this. The group takes a break every hour or hour and a half, and there is ALWAYS a table with snacks (cookies, candy, chips, nuts), free for the taking. Since I made this radical decision, I have been very strong and committed to this plan. I took Rose out to eat on July 4, and she consumed at the restaurant, and I had a Sonic cup with my own juice. Sunday evening we had long-time friends over for Chilean food. They partook of stuff that I really like, but I sat at the table, and drank my juice.

But, . . . at times past, when I was trying to eat sensibly, this program has been a challenge to me. The program is held at the local Holiday Inn. The group takes meals together, served by Holiday Inn staff. During meals this weekend, I will not go to the dining area. I will probably take a cooler with my juice, so during their meal times, I can drink my nourishment. I plan on resisting the temptation during break times. Writing my intention here will help me to get through this challenge.

Just wanted to let those who are interested how things are going.

Blessings to all!

The Beauty of a Phrase Well-Turned

I’ve always appreciated wordsmiths. I’ve got little or nothing of artistic creativity, but I enjoy words. Being a multilingual reader adds to my sense of amazement at the power of artistic words, capable of creating mental image, with no need of paint or canvas.

Southern Chile is beautiful. Eusebio Lillo and Bernardo de Vera y Pintado may have been thinking of her beauty when they wrote these words that Chileans sing as part of their National Anthem:

Puro Chile, es tu cielo azulado, Puras brisas te cruzan también, Y tu campo de flores bordados, Es la copia feliz del Edén.

Those lines speak of Chile being a “perfect copy of Eden.” Say, did you know the meaning of the name, Chile? Though disputed, one of the suggested meanings has its origin in an Aymara word that means “end of the earth.” That’s an interesting thought, a perfect copy of Eden, at the end of the earth.

Over a very long period of time now, I have been reading Isabel Allende’s new book, Inés, del Alma Mía (link to English translation), which is the story of Inés Suárez, who with Pedro de Valdivia, conquered Chile. I have seen her name on street signs before, without knowing about her story. Pedro de Valdivia is legendary in Chile (I knew a bit about his story), founding the city of Santiago (where we lived for many years). Academician don’t usually admit to liking or using Wikipedia. It is not a refereed encyclopedia, and doesn’t meet academic or scholarly standards. Many Wikipedia articles lack documentation. If you don’t tell anyone I pointed you to it, you can get some information about Inés Suárez without having to read the book by reading this article.

I’m almost done reading the book. Allende is a wordsmith in Spanish, a master storyteller. On page 328, I found these words, that describe Pedro de Valdivia being smitten with the beauty of Southern Chile, using the analogy of the garden of Eden, as well:

El Jardín del Edén, la tierra prometida, el paraíso. Mudo, mojado de lágrimas, el conquistador conquistado iba descubriendo el lugar donde acaba la tierra, Chile.

Whoa! Such a beautiful phrase takes the sting out of the Cubs being down 0-2 in the NLDS. Part of being made imago Dei, is our ability to use language to communicate about the glory of God. Thanks be to God!